Intermediate Workshops

I am a Refugee (originally called, “There is No Greater Sorrow” by Jonathan Neelands) – 7 to 9

Jonothan Neelands – Professor of Creative Education | Staff Directory | WBS

Inquiry Question:  What is it like for a refugee?

Workshop Description:
This workshop is based on a poignant drama written by Jonathan Neelands.  With the flight of so many refugees fleeing their homes and coming to start new lives, this kind of work is critical for building understanding and empathy.  This inquiry allows students of grades 6-9 to discover what it might be like for a refugee to move to a new country.  Various perspectives are explored and genuine understanding and empathy results.  Experience a workshop that will give you the tools to bring this timely education to your students.

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Poverty Amongst Us – What brain-compatible strategies can we use to engage our students? – 4 to 9

Inquiry Question: Why are children hungry among us? Could they be part of our classrooms?

Workshop Description:
Using literacy sources such as story, poems, and media, explore the issues of child poverty and homelessness through the power of experiential learning. Learn strategies for reaching our needy students.

Explore a unit of student work with the inquiry, “What is my role when others are in need?” Build awareness among your students in the struggle for equity and inspire a move towards social activism. Through poetry and active literacy strategies such as role play, writing in role and conducting voices, participants explore the topic layering their knowledge and experience as they create advocacy pieces for others. Complete unit will be sent to participants electronically.

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Us and Them – 7 to 9

Inquiry Question: What causes war?

Workshop Description: 
Through this powerful work on diversity and equity, students of grades 7 and 8, live inside a story (using multiple role play strategies) and together they go on a journey of twists and turns which teach real life lessons without the real life consequences.  They discover there really is no difference between “us” and “them.”  We have much in common with others and must find ways to appreciate and value what others have to offer knowing we will be enriched by it.  Through collaboration, problem solving, creativity and cross-curricular experiences, students learn to have compassion for people with values that are different from their own and accept people for who they are.  This unit reflects the bigger themes in Romeo and Juliet and could be considered an analogy of that famous story.

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